minima maxima sunt

The Small things are the Great things; as in a grain of mustard seed.

Archive for the tag “church”

Reading from Luke

Gospel reading from Luke. The Evangelical symbol of the bull belongs to Luke. Stuck to a more traditional book of hours scheme for the reading on this one. Lots of gold mixed with vines and wildlife.

Reading from John

Here is the reading from John. Was able to find some pictures on the net to reference the Evangelical Symbols. Johns is the eagle. I also chose to start the reading in Latin which will continue on the other readings.

September with fish and turtles

September ended up more on the whimsical side. Was partially inspired by a recent visit to St. Augustine, Florida. Some of the seaside local art helped me along with the theme for this month.img_0472img_0473
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August Thistle and Rose

August was a re-visit to the Flemish art style. Flowers with shadows make the panel art seem to pop out of the page. My first try at this was in February with Oak leaves.

So the top picture is obviously a rose surrounded by gold foil, the side panel… Are doodle flowers and I’m not sure if they could be tied to an actual type of flower in existence.

On the second page is Thistle surrounded by gold and on the side panel are Geranium. These grew wild in Alaska and I had a few of these planted in my yard when I lived there. They came back every year.

June and Kells

I decided to try a few designs from the Book of Kells in June. I ended up looking through several old manuscripts that fall into the Insular style of art. These include the Lindisfarne Gospels, Book of Durrow, Cathach of St. Columba, and of course the famous Book of Kells. So my poor attempts at knot work fill the pages here. Will need to work on these for better consistency and in future attempts to make them smaller and more fluid.

The “J” majuscule was a copy of one found in the Book of Kells as well as the peacock on the second page. Keeping with the style of insular illumination I didn’t add any gold foil to the pages in June. Insular illumination draws from the complex designs and imagery blended with the bright and carried colors. Yellow probably being used the most, other colors include purple, red, blue and greens. Animals and people also find their way into many of the designs in these books. If you ever have a chance to look at the art from Kells or Lindisfarne, you will see many times that even the knot work is a construct of animal shapes that have been morphed into the knot work. Truly amazing art.

I am most happy with the peacock on this page. I spent a lot of time trying to get the

right right feel on this and in the end it is the main attraction for June. Looking forward to doing more of these Celtic style designs in my book of hours and with any luck my knots will get better. …

May full of Sunflowers

Final for May in my book of hours. Had some fun with sunflowers for this page. I was thinking about what to do on this calendar page and all I kept getting was that old rhyme about April showers bringing May flowers. So I went with it.

On the first page I added a few Celtic trinity symbols that seemed to go nice with the sunflowers. Gold leaf fills in the rest of the center. Also tried a 3D spiral on the header bar that I saw in a real book of hours.

My wife has planted sunflowers before and while you know they are a big flower, it’s still amazing to see them up close and just how very large they can become. Once they are ripe the birds came in and devoured the seeds in just a few days.

A few more Celtic inspirations on the second page with some knot work. My knots need about as much work as my calligraphy. Lol. Still I like the result. The page is full of light and life.

Book of hours of Bénigne Serre, 1524

Several months ago I discovered a few places that will make replicas of Illuminated Manuscripts for a very reasonable price. Below is an example of my second purchase from one of these sites. These are printed pages and have no gold foil that you would find with a more expensive facsimile, but they are complete manuscripts, beautifully bound and covered by hand and they allow one to get a sense of reading, or just looking, at a book of hours.image

In the picture above I have the book cover shown. Decoration and a leather cover on it that will still need to rest as it was recently oiled. The pages, which you cannot see, were given gilded edges. The replica is of the Book of Hours of Bénigne Serre:

“A book of hours following the liturgical custom of Rome, with a calendar containing a selection of saints for Langres. The manuscript was illuminated and dated in 1524 by a Master of Bénigne Serre, who was known by the name of his client, a highly-ranked official of the King of Burgundy. The artist was a hitherto unknown illuminator from the circle of the “1520s The Hours Workshop,” which framed the miniatures with Renaissance architecture or added naturalistic flowers and animals to borders. This manuscript contains a number of unusual images, e.g., for the Lauds of the Office of the Virgin, the meeting of Joachim and Anna at the city gate of Jerusalem replaces the usual image of the Visitation. In the 18th century, the manuscript was owned by the family Bretagne of Dijon.” More information on this Book of Hours and contents.
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Above is a text page from this manuscript. The writing is in Latin and all the pages in this book have excellent designs showing flowers, animals, people and places in the side bars. Below I have a few examples of some of the full page illustrations found in this book. These would normally indicate the beginning of a section of texts, prayers or psalms. The first is the adoration of the Magi from the “Hours of the Virgin”.  Joseph is in the door of the building behind, Mary and the Christ child in center and the Magi on the right.
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This next picture shows a much darker scene as Death, riding a bull, slays a man. The text starts the Office of the Dead for Vespers. These are prayers for those in Purgatory.  The text follows from Psalm 116

“1 My heart is aflame, so graciously the Lord listens to my entreaty; 2 the Lord, who grants me audience when I invoke his name. 3 Death’s noose about me, caught in the snares of the grave, ever I found distress and grief at my side, 4 till I called upon the Lord, Save me, Lord, in my peril. 5 Merciful the Lord our God is, and just, and full of pity; 6 he cares for simple hearts, and to me, when I lay humbled, he brought deliverance. 7 Return, my soul, where thy peace lies; the Lord has dealt kindly with thee; 8 he has saved my life from peril, banished my tears, kept my feet from falling. 9 Mine to walk at ease, enjoying the Lord’s presence, in the land of the living.”

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This last picture shows Mary as a young girl with St. Anne. This comes in the end of the book in what are called the “Suffrages”. These are prayers to Saints, or rather petitions to those saints to keep us in their prayers. The text in the picture translates: “A heavenly blessing entered into Anne, through whom the Virgin Mary was born for us.”
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For more information on reproductions you can visit this website.
Golden Gryphon Productions

Sunflower

Well it’s been a while since I’ve been able to get out in the garage and hack away at the canvas. For some time now the idea of making a stained glass picture has been bouncing around in my mind. Staining glass is a mystics art. It requires light to reveal the scene like any other picture but it’s when light penetrates through the glass that all is revealed. Anyone that knows me should have seen this coming. After all I have stained most of the windows in my house and love to check out those beautiful gothic cathedrals and church buildings adorned with this art. I chose a simple idea, the sunflower (which also happens to be my wife’s favorite flower ;). ), and tried to keep the colors rich and strong to retain the feel of a stained glass. This was such a fun project that I’m already gearing up for a few more in this style. IMG_0298.JPG

Kells Eagle

Been on hiatus for a bit and hoping to get back into the blogs. I have had time for a new offering of art. Now right off the bat, I need to say that I didn’t draw this. I really did just fill in with color and gold and paint. I kind of took the tattoo approach and applied it to a manuscript. Using gel pens, gold paint for “gilding”, sharpies, and watercolor, I was planning to take a few pics of illuminated manuscripts and touch them over. Sort of a faux facsimile.

The Kells eagle is one of my favorite symbol from historical Christian imagery. It represents the Apostle John and this pic is based on the Book of Kells version of this Evangelical Symbol.

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Missa – Pater Noster

3512137269_0180b8cf3bThe Lord’s Prayer is probably the most recognized prayer in the church. Along with the Hail Mary and Psalm 23, it would be fair to say that even most non Christians would recognize the prayer because of its popularity, and unlike any other prayer; this prayer was given to the church in words vocalized by the incarnation of the Most High God; Jesus Christ.

It should go without saying that among the church this prayer has a very special place. The very idea of the Saviour demonstrating this example of prayer to the disciples must at the very least give rise to all sorts of speculation as to its relevance to the Christian community. To hear intonation and accent, observe facial expression, to feel the depth of meaning that must be weighed as it poured from the mouth of Christ, as only an author could provide to give life to the poetry he creates, must have been like standing on a cliffs edge. And as we pray, as Church, the mystical body of Christ, whether by ourselves or gathered together as we are hidden with Christ in God in the Divine Liturgy, I cannot allow myself to think of anything less as the words form in my own throat, as air passes through vocal chords translating the thoughts in my brain, to words. I am praying with Jesus Christ.

The Lords Prayer follows the Eucharistic prayers and the Great Amen and begins the Communion Rite.

The Priest will say:

At the Savior’s command

and formed by divine teaching,

we dare to say:

Then extend his hands to the people as we all recite:

Our Father, who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy name;

thy kingdom come,

thy will be done

on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread,

and forgive us our trespasses,

as we forgive those who trespass against us;

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

Then the Priest continues:

Deliver us, Lord, we pray, from every evil,

graciously grant peace in our days,

that, by the help of your mercy,

we may be always free from sin

and safe from all distress,

as we await the blessed hope

and the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ.

Then he folds his hands and the people all conclude the prayer by praying:

For the kingdom,

the power and the glory are yours

now and for ever.

Pater Noster, from the title of this post,  is Latin for the opening line of the prayer, Our Father. Most prayers in the church, as well as documents and encyclicals will use this device in naming which is why you may hear a Catholic refer to the Lord’s Prayer as the “Our Father” “Hail Mary”, or “Glory be”. Here is the prayer in Latin:

PATER NOSTER,

qui es in caelis,

sanctificetur nomen tuum.

Adveniat regnum tuum.

Fiat voluntas tua,

sicut in caelo et in terra.

Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie,

et dimitte nobis debita nostra

sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris.

Et ne nos inducas in tentationem,

sed libera nos a malo. Amen.

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